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Elton Trademarked Logo [1] Leigh Arthur Elkington was born in 1884 and lived in New York. He opened his first company and according to ...

L. A. Elkington and Elton Musical Products

The word Elton in an invisible oval shape
Elton Trademarked Logo [1]
Leigh Arthur Elkington was born in 1884 and lived in New York. He opened his first company and according to the 1920 census, he was the owner of a metal goods business. The name Elkington Co first appears in 1927 and by 1946 the company was known as L. A. Elkington Co. 

He was successful and continued to expand and purchase smaller companies and product lines to bolster his brand. In 1927 he bought out the fife and flageolet merchandising and tooling from the Rudolph Wurlitzer company  [5]. A year later he purchased the Eventone Manufacturing Co, which included the patent rights to the Eventone Letter Violin Mute [6].

Elkington died in 1967, at the age of 85, but his company continued and was an exhibitor at NAMM 1970 [2][9]. The company name was renewed in 1971 by a Jules N. Bloch and continued until it was dissolved in 1993 [3]. 

Products

Where the name 'Elton' originated from is unclear but the brand was first used in 1915 and first appeared in retail in 1920 [1]. According to a 1971 filing with the United States Patent and Trademark Office, the Elton brand was used for "Musical Instruments, and Parts Therefor; And Musical Accessories-namely, Instrument Supports, Fasteners, Holders, Straps, Arm Rests, Head Guards, Capos, Megaphones, Gauges, Stands, Picks, Mutes, Twirling and Directors' Batons, and Carrying Cases Therefor, Reed Trimmers, Electric Reed Selectors, Cleaning Rods, Ligatures, Lyres, Music Racks and Clips, and Piano Tuning Hammers, and Pedal Extenders." 

Paper label from a tube of Elton nickel fret wire
A 1922 issue of the Music Trade Review discusses a circular distributed by C. Bruno & Son where they advocate for the value of Elton banjo resonators [4]. Following closely after were mutes for brass instruments which appeared in 1923 [2]. 


1935 Elton Tailpiece
Image Credit: VintAxe

Elkington also built spring capos for guitars using the L. Filstrup design which was patented in 1889 (and expired in 1906). His capos differed from the originals but not being made of solid brass but instead of stamped metal. He did, however, continue stamping the original patent date on the capo [7][8]. 

Sources

[3] https://appext20.dos.ny.gov/corp_public/CORPSEARCH.ENTITY_INFORMATION?p_token=B81C0DCF5BE68579BE57A42A5CCEA8474CB70B743D15832FCB3C39A4C7D7D95C5C2023CDD71D19C92CFBD33092F16E57&p_nameid=3637F0D4B4F54B50&p_corpid=5379364DEE09AE45&p_captcha=12769&p_captcha_check=B81C0DCF5BE68579BE57A42A5CCEA8474CB70B743D15832FCB3C39A4C7D7D95C5CA6CE17D3DFA9B9565413E2368C61E1&p_entity_name=%65%6C%6B%69%6E%67%74%6F%6E&p_name_type=%25&p_search_type=%43%4F%4E%54%41%49%4E%53&p_srch_results_page=0
[4] https://mtr.arcade-museum.com/MTR-1922-74-20/31/
[5] https://mtr.arcade-museum.com/MTR-1927-85-10/19/
[6] https://presto.arcade-museum.com/PRESTO-1928-2172/index.php?page_no=15
[7] http://acousticguitarcabin.boards.net/thread/450/elton
[8] https://patents.google.com/patent/US402577A/en?oq=us+402577
[9] https://books.google.com/books?id=dCkEAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA75&lpg=PA75&dq=L.+A.+ELKINGTON+CORPORATION&source=bl&ots=0DGiAPo2dU&sig=ACfU3U3ptn9YnYUO1twNWSdNzUYkZX3zFw&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwi60M2ouNvnAhXKK80KHSMJBg4Q6AEwC3oECAQQAQ#v=onepage&q=L.%20A.%20ELKINGTON%20CORPORATION&f=false

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Be excellent to each other dudes